There are No Shortcuts

I read this article some time ago, but rediscovered it today. In it, the author took a look at the fitness industry, and it’s tendency to give folks a false sense of hope; to instill the belief that optimal results can be achieved with minimal effort.

To highlight this illusion, he went on to take his own before and after pictures, manipulating the light, and other elements of his appearance in such a way to create the perception that he had gone through a real transformation, when in reality, nothing really changed.

“Long-lasting results take years of consistency, hard work and dedication. Results that happen quickly are often temporary, and this is another factor that needs to be taken into account when looking at these transformations. “

Read: Seduced by the Illusion: The Truth About Transformation Photos

Although he ends his story by encouraging readers not to compete with the models in the advertisements, or work towards unattainable societal standards, I think the message can spread beyond health & fitness.

One lesson that I took away from reading his story, is that no matter what the transformation is that we might be trying to make, there are no short cuts to, and no substitutes for, a genuine commitment to seeing it through.

Ubuntu,

From Aspiring Humanitarian, Relando Thompkins, MSW, LLMSW

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I'm a Social Worker, Educator, and Aspiring Humanitarian who is interested in conflict resolution, improving intergroup relations, and building more equitable and inclusive communities. "Notes from an Aspiring Humanitarian" is my blog, where I write about issues of diversity, inclusion, equity, and social justice. By exploring social identities through written word, film & video, and other forms of media, I hope to continue to expand and enrich conversations about social issues that face our society, and to find ways to take social action while encouraging others to do so as well in their own ways.

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