13TH Is A Documentary You Should Watch Right Now

“So lets look at the statistics. The United States is home to five percent of the world’s population, but but 25 percent of the world’s prisoners. Think about that.”

–President Barack Obama

Trailer description:

“The title of Ava DuVernay’s extraordinary and galvanizing documentary 13TH refers to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which reads “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States.”

The progression from that second qualifying clause to the horrors of mass criminalization and the sprawling American prison industry is laid out by DuVernay with bracing lucidity. With a potent mixture of archival footage and testimony from a dazzling array of activists, politicians, historians, and formerly incarcerated women and men, DuVernay creates a work of grand historical synthesis.”

This documentary just dropped on Netflix today. I had a chance to watch it myself, and if you have access, I highly recommend that you check it out.

It covers the inescapable and undeniable connections of the legal and political system to the mass incarceration of Black people, the “war on drugs” and the prison industrial complex as a response to the abolition of slavery; tying historical examples to what’s happening today, including #BlackLivesMatter.

 

Ubuntu,

From Aspiring Humanitarian, Relando Thompkins-Jones, MSW, LLMSW

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Written by

I’m a Social Justice Educator and Aspiring Humanitarian who is interested in conflict resolution, improving intergroup relations, and building more equitable and inclusive communities.

“Notes from an Aspiring Humanitarian” is my blog, where I write about issues of diversity, inclusion, equity, and social justice. By exploring social identities through written word, film & video, and other forms of media, I hope to continue to expand and enrich conversations about social issues that face our society, and to find ways to take social action while encouraging others to do so as well in their own ways.

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